Maria Elena G. Macario (1953-2010) Seventh Year Death Anniversary – Dec. 10, 2017

“Compared to Phyllis Gardner’s experience, my late wife’s ordeal was much worse. Despite her MS in Petroleum Engineering from Stanford; her accomplishments in the geothermal industry, Maria Elena G. Macario died penniless. on Dec. 10, 2010, while the children and grandchildren of quisling-oligarchs are listed on Forbes Magazine among the 40 richest in the Philippines.
Yet they never invented, developed or discovered anything even remotely associated to their unexplained wealth. How could this build up of unexplained wealth by those whose parents and grandparents worked for the Japanese in WWII go on for over 72 years without Washington DC’s knowledge and tacit approval?”
    ============
On Oct. 25, 2017, after 75 years, the US Congress finally recognized Filipino WWWII service and sacrifice and awarded them with the Congressional Gold Medal the highest honor, Congress could bestow upon a civilian.  But were Filipino WWII veterans given a civilian and not a military medal? That’s for another discussion and post.  
 

 

Dec. 10, 2017 is Elena’s 7th year death anniversary and to remember her I’m writing a comment on “Gender Issues – Gender Inequality” the topic of Phyllis Gardner’s post last Nov. 28, 2017.

 

See: Gender Inequality in…OB/Gyn (Phyllis Gardner, USA, 11/28/17 4:10 am)

http://waisworld.org/go.jsp?id=02a&objectType=post&o=117581&objectTypeId=86805&topicId=114

 

Last September, I was going through my files and found two items:

 

One was a fax letter dated Mar. 4, 2004 Elena sent to a financing company explaining how after finishing her MS in Petroleum Engineering at Stanford, we both worked for the same geothermal firm, Magma Power, lost our jobs and later we had to file for bankruptcy.

 

The other was a photo of Elena in the 1993 Energy Exposition in Manila, manning the booth of Magma Power Company, the geothermal firm we help secure a BOT contract (build-operate-transfer) with EDC-PNOC (Energy Development Corp.) geothermal division of PNOC, Phil. National Oil Company. PNOC was my late wife’s employer when she was in the Philippines.

 

It was the first contract Magma Power ever landed overseas.  It was also PNOC first time to deal with a foreign corporation. And it was also the first time the World Bank ever financed a geothermal power plant project in the Philippines.

 

Securing the BOT contract in the Philippines was so good for Magma Power that it became a takeover target and by March 1995, CalEnergy headed by David Sokol took over Magma Power. CalEnergy later became MidAmerican Energy Holdings Company a subsidiary of Warren Buffet’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc.

 

As a “reward” for our efforts working since Aug. 1992 to secure those contracts in the Philippines, in April 1995, I was laid off and Elena was transferred to Ridgecrest, CA.

 

While we were in Ridgecrest, Elena received a job offer to return to and work in the Philippines. The offer came from First Gas Power Corporation, a company owned by the oligarch family, the Lopezes, who despite their Spanish sounding name, are in fact ethnic Chinese.

 

As for me, ever since I came here in 1987, there has always been this very strong discouragement for me to stay here. Powerful people in the Philippines have always more than hinted that I should return and remain in the Philippines.

 

Having my college transcript of records sent from Lyceum where I earned my BSBA, directly to a school where I’m applying for graduate studies is a problem to this day.

 

It was out of this frustration that I first wrote on WAIS that “Except for the Philippines, in which known quislings & collaborators “declared” independence 1946”

See: re: Turkey & the EU; Mexico & the US (Bienvenido Macario, Philippines)

February 09, 2007

http://waisworld.org/go.jsp?id=02a&objectType=post&o=13691&objectTypeId=7941&topicId=1

Elena G. Macario in the 1993 Energy Exposition in Manila, manning the booth of Magma Power Company. During the exhibition, US Ambassador John Negropointe visited Magma Power's booth and even posed for a photo with Elena.
Elena G. Macario in the 1993 Energy Exposition in Manila, manning the booth of Magma Power Company. During the exhibition, US Ambassador John Negropointe visited Magma Power’s booth and even posed for a photo with Elena.

My alma mater, Lyceum of the Philippines, was founded by quisling Jose P. Laurel, the puppet president appointed by the Japanese occupation army in WWII. His grandchildren are still in control of their family business established during the Japanese occupation.

Elena G. Macario in the 1993 Energy Exposition in Manila, manning the booth of Magma Power Company. During the exhibition, US Ambassador John Negropointe dropped by Magma Power’s booth and posed for a photo with Elena.

Elena s letter explaining why we had to file for bankruptcy 03-04-2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MGM Stanford MS Paper March 1991 p1&2

 

I’ll call this post: Gender & Race Issues -> Gender & Race Inequality.

We already know that Filipino WWII veterans were denied military benefits retroactively to accommodate MacArthur’s fair-haired boy Manuel A. Roxas who was a Brig. General in the U.S. Army and was even wearing his uniform while collaborating with the Japanese as the closest adviser and colleague of quisling JP Laurel.

A review of Stanley Karnow’s book In Our Image – America’s Empire in the Philippines” (1989) by Publishers Weekly summed up and confirmed what I’ve been saying:

Whether as Native Americans or war veterans, those from the Philippines, the only US territory ever granted independence, are the most marginalized.

There was no referendum asking the Natives of the Philippines if we wanted to secede from the union with the US. After WW2 we were handed over the quislings & traitors who helped the Japanese Imperial Army during the brutal occupation of the Philippines.
Yet, I don’t know of Filipinos using the national anthem to air out their grievances.

“He (Karnow) shows that a succession of U.S. presidents and administrators coddled the archipelago’s 60 or so ruling families, perpetuating the feudal oligarchy that continues to this day, and widening the gap between rich and poor.”

 

And as usual, American journalists could never blame the U.S. Congress that passes the bills which the president, as chief executive, merely executes.

 

Karnow’s book that won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1990, is an excellent reference  book on Philippine History and should be a required reading in the U.S. and the Philippines, especially past, present and future officials and employees of the State Department, US military, US AID,  and the Peace Corps who are in anyway involved or will be involved directly or indirectly to the Philippines.

After reading this book, one would realize that the US government is guilty of aiding and abetting treason, corruption, oppression and tyranny in the Philippines to this day.

===============

Publishers Weekly’s review of Stanley Karnow’s book; “In Our Image: America’s Empire in the Philippines” (1989) Publisher: Random House

https://www.amazon.com/In-Our-Image-Americas-

 

About the Author

Stanley Karnow won the Pulitzer Prize for this account of America’s imperial experience in the Philippines. In a swiftly paced, brilliantly vivid narrative, Karnow focuses on the relationship that has existed between the two nations since the United States acquired the country from Spain in 1898, examining how we have sought to remake the Philippines “in our image,” an experiment marked from the outset by blundering, ignorance, and mutual misunderstanding.

 

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Though Karnow claims that U.S. imperialism in its former colony, the Philippines, has been “uniquely benign” compared to European colonialism, the evidence set forth in this colorful, briskly readable history undercuts that prognosis. He shows that a succession of U.S. presidents and administrators coddled the archipelago’s 60 or so ruling families, perpetuating the feudal oligarchy that continues to this day, and widening the gap between rich and poor.

Karnow, whose Vietnam: A History is a standard account of the American venture in Southeast Asia, draws intriguing parallels: the U.S.-Philippine war of 1898, much like the Vietnam experience, dehumanized U.S. troops, who looted and annihilated villages; ex-President Marcos, like South Vietnamese ruler Diem, presented Washington with the problem of how to deal with a client state that squandered its credibility. In Karnow’s assessment, the “new prosperity” under Corazon Aquino has not touched the Filipino countryside or slums. Photos. Author tour.

 

Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

 

Book: In Our Image: America’s Empire in the Philippines

Publisher: Random House (1989)

https://www.amazon.com/In-Our-Image-Americas-Philippines/dp/0345328167

Book Review of S. Karnow's In Our Image - America s Empire in the Philippines (1989)

 

Editorial Review of Stanley Karnow’s “In Our Image: America’s Empire in the Philippines” (1989)

Book Review of S. Karnow's In Our Image - America s Empire in the Philippines (1989)

This is a good book on Philippine History that should be a required reading in the U.S. and the Philippines.

Stanley Karnow’s book, “In Our Image: America’s Empire in the Philippines” (1989) won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1990.

History will judge us all.

=============

“He (Karnow) shows that ***a succession of U.S. presidents and administrators coddled the archipelago’s 60 or so ruling families, perpetuating the feudal oligarchy that continues to this day^, and widening the gap between rich and poor.***”

(As usual, American journalists could never blame the U.S. Congress that pass the bill which the president, as chief executive, merely executes. – BM 12-09-17)

 

Excerpt from the editorial review by Publishers Weekly

Book: In Our Image: America’s Empire in the Philippines

Publisher: Random House (1989)

 

About the Author

Stanley Karnow won the Pulitzer Prize for this account of America’s imperial experience in the Philippines. In a swiftly paced, brilliantly vivid narrative, Karnow focuses on the relationship that has existed between the two nations since the United States acquired the country from Spain in 1898, examining how we have sought to remake the Philippines “in our image,” an experiment marked from the outset by blundering, ignorance, and mutual misunderstanding.

 

Editorial Reviews

 

From Publishers Weekly

Though Karnow claims that U.S. imperialism in its former colony, the Philippines, has been “uniquely benign” compared to European colonialism, the evidence set forth in this colorful, briskly readable history undercuts that prognosis. He shows that a succession of U.S. presidents and administrators coddled the archipelago’s 60 or so ruling families, perpetuating the feudal oligarchy that continues to this day, and widening the gap between rich and poor. Karnow, whose Vietnam: A History is a standard account of the American venture in Southeast Asia, draws intriguing parallels: the U.S.-Philippine war of 1898, much like the Vietnam experience, dehumanized U.S. troops, who looted and annihilated villages; ex-President Marcos, like South Vietnamese ruler Diem, presented Washington with the problem of how to deal with a client state that squandered its credibility. In Karnow’s assessment, the “new prosperity” under Corazon Aquino has not touched the Filipino countryside or slums. Photos. Author tour.

Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

 

Book: In Our Image: America’s Empire in the Philippines

Publisher: Random House (1989)

https://www.amazon.com/In-Our-Image-Americas-Philippines/dp/0345328167

From Library Journal

Philippine history is often described as 300 years in a (Spanish) convent and 50 years in Hollywood. Karnow, who worked for 30 years as a journalist in Asia, narrates the careers of several individuals who influenced the Philippines. His treatment of the indecisiveness of President McKinley over the issue of empire and of the egotistical General MacArthur make the work a definite purchase for libraries.

Weaker in treatment is the post-independence period, where Karnow concentrates upon Marcos and Aquino, both of whom he knows. Particularly revealing is his account of the White House coming to terms with the Aquino election victory. Those who love swashbuckling history will enjoy this work.
– Donald Clay Johnson, Univ. of Minnesota Libs., Minneapolis
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

 

 

Review

“Stanley Karnow Has Written The Ultimate Book — brilliant, panoramic, engrossing — about American behavior overseas in the twentieth century.”

— The Boston Sunday Globe

“A Page-Turning Story and Authoritative History.”

— The New York Times

“Perhaps The Best Journalist Writing On Asian Affairs.”

— Newsweek

From the Publisher

“An impressively researched study of an adventure in empire that dared not speak its name.”–The New Republic

From the Back Cover

In a swiftly paced, brilliantly vivid narrative, Karnow focuses on the relationship that has existed between the two nations since the United States acquired the country from Spain in 1898, examing how we have sought to remake the Philippines ‘in our image, ‘ an experiment marked from the outset by blundering, ignorance, and mutual misunderstanding.

About the Author

Stanley Karnow won the Pulitzer Prize for this account of America’s imperial experience in the Philippines. In a swiftly paced, brilliantly vivid narrative, Karnow focuses on the relationship that has existed between the two nations since the United States acquired the country from Spain in 1898, examining how we have sought to remake the Philippines “in our image,” an experiment marked from the outset by blundering, ignorance, and mutual misunderstanding.